New COVID-19 Vaccination Plan

New 12 Best COVID-19 Prevention Strategies

CDC Guide for COVID-19 Transmission Based Precautions

King County Health Dept requires face masks

New COVID-19 Restrictions Effective 11/15

COVID-19 Washington State Risk Assessment Dashboard

COVID-19 Washington State Testing Guidance

Summary of New CDC COVID-19 Guidance: Discontinuation of Isolation and Other Transmission Based Precautions (TBP)
Provided By BLNR Member Dr. George Gey, MD July 22, 2020

Patients with mild to moderate illness who are not severely immunocompromised:
• At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared and
• At least 24 hours have passed since last fever without the use of
fever-reducing medications and symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath) have improved
 
Note: For patients who are not severely immunocompromised and who were
asymptomatic throughout their infection, transmission based precautions may
be discontinued when at least 10 days have passed since the date of their
first positive viral diagnostic test: (click here for detailed information)

2020-2021 Flu Season – How to Stay Healthy
Provided By George Gey, MD (09/23/2020)
(click here for printable copy)

Being healthy this winter is not going to be easy with Covid-19 and the flu.

This year the CDC is recommending Influenza vaccinations for persons older than 65 years who have no contradications, such as egg allergy and/or severe reactions to flu vaccines.

There are new vaccines which are not produced in eggs. They are cell based vaccines

This could be used in persons who are allergic to egg based vaccines.

The new quadrivalent dead virus vaccine for this winter includes A/Brisbane (H1N1), A/Kansas (H3N2), B/Colorado, and B/Phuket.
 
There is a high dose dead virus vaccine also available. This is sometimes recommended for persons older than 65 years. This can be given intramuscularly with an adjuvant which stimulates your white cell response.

You can check with your health care provider which vaccine is right for you.

Remember the flu virus changes with each flu season. Prevention is more important at the end of flu season. New digital immune-assay and rapid nucleic amplification test can identify viruses. It’s a 5-30 minute process. Early diagnosis and treatment can save lives. There are antiviral antibiotics available for treatment for the flu viruses.
 
A web site in your area offers flu information: https://flunearyou.org/.

It is important to avoid places where large numbers of people congregate when flu is prevalent. More information can be obtained at CDC.gov web site.
 
There is no Covid-19 vaccine available at the present time and this will probably not be ready for public use until it is tested. Prevention is key to protecting yourself and family.

Remember to wear a mask, wash your hands, and keep your social distance at 6 plus feet.

Most large facilities have screening before you enter. Stay home if you have flu like symptoms and call your health care provider especially if you have a fever at 100.4F or above. Keep in mind that Covid-19 may not cause any symptoms.